2008 Summer Workshop

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GEM will be holding its annual summer workshop jointly with SHINE at the Zermatt Resort and Spa in Midway, Utah during June 22-27, 2008. Registration and lodging reservations can be made at the GEM Workshop Web Site by June 6, 2008.

The following GEM and joint GEM-SHINE sessions are calling for presentations. The detailed agenda is provided here.

Presentations:

  1. Upper Atmosphere Budgets - Kile Baker

(Note: In the e-mail addresses below the symbol @ is replaced by " [at] ".)

Contents

Plasmasphere-Magnetosphere Interactions [New Focus Group]

Conveners: Jerry Goldstein <jgoldstein [at] swri.edu> and Joe Borovsky <jborovsky [at] lanl.gov>

The 2008 GEM workshop will feature three sessions for the new Focus Group "Plasmasphere-Magnetosphere Interactions" (PMI). This focus group seeks to improve our understanding of the two-way coupling between the plasmasphere and magnetosphere. The Focus Group proposal is available at

http://enarc.space.swri.edu/PAPERS/FTP/GEM/PMI-FG-Proposal_v2.doc or http://tinyurl.com/6d56vj

The three (3) PMI sessions to be held at the upcoming 2008 GEM:

Tue, 24 June, 10:30 a.m. - 12:15 p.m., PMI 1 (morning): "Waves in the Plasmasphere-Magnetosphere System"

This session will examine the conditions for growth and propagation of various waves including EMIC, whistlers (hiss, chorus), ULF, and their importance to energetic particle dynamics. Emphasis will be placed upon the origin and influence of ambient plasma properties (such as density, composition, and spatial structure on various scale sizes).

Tue, 24 June, 1:30 - 3:00 p.m., PMI 2 (afternoon): "Dynamics and Recirculation of Plasmaspheric Plumes"

This session will examine the formation, dynamics, and fate of plasmaspheric plume plasma. Specific topics to be addressed include (but are not limited to): observation or modeling of cold, dense plasma mixed with magnetospheric plasma, plume plasma at reconnection sites or on open field lines, recirculation or redistribution of cold, dense plasma into the cusp and plasmasheet.

Tue, 24 June, 3:30 - 5:00 p.m., PMI Planning: "Focus Group Planning Session (Open Discussion)"

The PMI Planning Session will allow the GEM community to participate in an open forum. A strawman schedule (for the coming years of PMI activity) will be presented for consideration and free-form discussion. This schedule is available at http://tinyurl.com/5ro8xg

We welcome the contribution of brief (a few slides, or ~5 minutes) presentations to support this session. We are looking for presentations that fit any of the following criteria

  • Highlights a particular science topic that is already included in the PMI schedule (http://tinyurl.com/5ro8xg), and maps out a campaign for closure on this topic.
  • Highlights an important science topic that is NOT included in the PMI schedule.
  • Presents suggestions to improve or refine the current PMI schedule.

Anyone interested in participating or contributing is encouraged to email Jerry Goldstein (jgoldstein [at] swri.edu) or Joe Borovsky (jborovsky [at] lanl.gov).

Substorm Expansion Onset: The First 10 Minutes [New Focus Group]

Conveners: Vassilis Angelopoulos <vassilis [at] ucla.edu>, Shin Ohtani <Shin.Ohtani [at] jhuapl.edu> and Kazuo Shiokawa <shiokawa [at] stelab.nagoya-u.ac.jp>

Additional Note: We updated the site http://www.igpp.ucla.edu/public/THEMIS/SCI/events with presentations by Tony and Andrei regarding the substorm onsets of Jan 29 and Mar 1st.

(Original announcement) At the upcoming GEM workshop in Zermatt Utah (June 22-27, 2008; http://www.cpe.vt.edu/gem/), we will have 3 breakout sessions on June 25 (Wed). Each session is organized in a workshop style with a focus on specific science questions. We invite contributions to discussion by presenting a few slides on the identified issues. The following are details of each session:

Session 1: "Timing", Time: June 25 (Wed) 10:30 am – 12:15 pm, Room: Grindelwald

Science Questions: What is the time sequence of onset-related phenomena observed in space and on the ground, and what are the implications for substorm onset processes?

Lead Presenters: Sibeck (overview), Mende-for-Lui (Jan. 29 event), and Angelopoulos-for-Runov (Mar. 1 event)

Details: We will discuss two pre-selected substorm events, one on January 29, 2008 (07-09 UT) and another on March 1, 2008 (01-05 UT). In both events the THEMIS satellites were aligned in the magnetotail allowing us to address radial propagation of onset signatures, and the onset times were well identified from THEMIS ground observations. Preliminary studies suggest that the January 29 event fits to the inside-out model, whereas the March 1 event to the outside-in model. Details of those events may be browsed at http://www.igpp.ucla.edu/public/THEMIS/SCI/events. We encourage participants to critically examine and discuss each event.

Session 2: "Pre-onset/breakup auroral arcs", Time: June 25 (Wed) 1:30 pm – 3:00 pm, Room: Grindelwald

Science Questions: 1) How does aurora evolve around substorm onsets? 2) Is the onset arc formation an outcome of the M-I coupling, or is it a manifestation of a tail process? 3) Is the breakup arc Alfvenic or inverted-V? For the former, how is the associated process related to the formation of the substorm wedge system?

Lead Presenters: Mende (observation) and Lysak (theory)

Details: Following two short reviews, one about new observations and another about the M-I coupling theory, we will discuss auroral dynamics around the onset of substorms. Recent ground observations revealed that a new arc is often formed immediately before auroral breakups, and satellite observations suggest that some onset-related arcs can be explained in terms of Alfven waves rather than inverted-V acceleration. We will discuss implications of those observations for substorm onset processes.

Session 3: "Onset mapping", Time: June 25 (Wed) 3:30 pm – 5:00 pm, Room: Grindelwald

Science Questions: How does the presence and evolution of pre-onset and expansion-phase onset current systems affect the link between auroral and plasma sheet locations and processes?

Lead Presenters: Lyons (observation), Connors (observation) and Birn (modeling)

Details: It is often the case that satellite observations and ground, especially auroral, observations support different models of substorm trigger. In this session we will discuss the (missing) link of magnetospheric and ionospheric substorm signatures from the viewpoint of current systems, and we will seek observational constraints on modeling the substorm trigger process.

Anyone interested in participating in the discussion is encouraged to email Vassilis Angelopoulos (vassilis [at] ucla.edu), Kazuo Shiokawa (Shiokawa [at] stelab.nagoya-u.ac.jp), and Shin Ohtani(ohtani [at] jhuapl.edu).

Modes of Solar Wind-Magnetosphere Energy Transfer [New Focus Group]

Conveners: Larry Kepko <larry.kepko [at] unh.edu> and Bob McPherron <rmcpherron [at] igpp.ucla.edu>

This focus group seeks to improve our knowledge of the physical mechanisms that provide for different dynamical modes of response of the magnetotail to the solar wind. At the upcoming GEM workshop we will have 2 breakout sessions, both on Tuesday, June 24 (10:30-12:15 and 1:30-3:00). A tentative schedule is

Session 1 (Tuesday, 10:30-12:15): Long duration convection events (SMCs, Sawtooth, etc.)

This session examines both large scale and long duration magnetospheric convection events. This includes steady magnetospheric convection (SMC), Sawtooth events, and High-Intensity, Long Duration, Continuous Auroral Activity (HILDCAA) events. Discussions of how the magnetosphere enters the different modes are particularly encouraged. The preliminary list of speakers includes: Henderson, Borovsky, Cai, Connors, Lyons, McWilliams and DeJonga.

Session 2 (Tuesday, 1:30-3:00): Small scale/short duration convection events (pseudo breakups, PBIs, etc.)

This session focuses on small scale and/or short duration convective events, such as poleward boundary intensifications and pseudo breakups. The preliminary list of speakers includes: Zesta, Hsu, McPherron and Stauning.

Speakers are encouraged to address 1 or more of these aspects of the particular transport mode:

  • The particular state of solar wind conditions associated with the response mode
  • The internal state of the magnetosphere during the response mode
  • What causes the transition into or out of a mode

Interested participants should email either Larry Kepko (larry.kepko [at] unh.edu) or Bob McPherron (rmcpherron [at] igpp.ucla.edu).


GGCM Metrics and Validation

Conveners: Aaron Ridley <ridley [at] umich.edu> and Masha Kuznetsova

Many of the modeling groups within the GEM community have concentrated on improving the specification of the inner magnetosphere. We would therefore like to invite presentations on validations of the inner magnetosphere models and how models have improved by introducing the missing physics. For example, global MHD model results tend to improve when they are coupled with Rice Convection Model that handles the drift physics properly. We invite presentations showing the quantitative improvements in the inner magnetospheric modeling. Comparison with observations at geosynchronous orbit are encouraged.

We would like to attempt to have some common modeling time-periods. Many researchers have investigated some of the time-periods listed below. If you have inner magnetosphere modeling validation results for the following times, please come and show them.

  • May 4, 1998 - complex storm
  • July 15, 2000 - very strong drivers (sub-Alfvenic solar wind)
  • March 31, 2001 - HUGE storm
  • August 4, 2001 - constant mild drivers
  • August 31, 2001 - constant mild drivers
  • April 17, 2002 - complex 4-day storm
  • October 29, 2003 - 2 HUGE complex storms
  • November 20, 2003 - HUGE storm
  • September 2, 2004 - weak substorm
  • December 10, 1996

Presentations on inner magnetosphere metrics that include other time-periods are also welcomed.

Researches are invited to request simulations at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) Web site (http://ccmc.gsfc.nasa.gov). CCMC Runs on request system is set to allow comparison between different global MHD codes for different simulations grids, conductance models, coupling options, etc. Model outputs along satellite trajectories (including geosynchronous orbits) are provided. For more information on CCMC Runs on request system and/or to request special simulation settings please contact Masha Kuznetsova.


GGCM Modules and Methods

From: John Dorelli <john.dorelli [at] unh.edu>

There will be two breakout sessions, both scheduled for Wednesday, at the 2008 GEM workshop:

Wed, June 25, 10:30 a.m. - 12:15 p.m., "Solar wind-magnetosphere coupling: Theory and simulations"

This session will focus on three questions:

  1. Can we develop accurate physics based solar wind-magnetosphere coupling functions (perhaps using global MHD simulations for guidance)?
  2. How does reconnection depend on local plasma parameters (e.g., local magnetic field, density, resistivity) in global MHD simulations?
  3. What is the role of the Hall effect (and other kinetic scale physics) in magnetospheric reconnection?

Wed, June 25, 1:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m., "How does the physics of magnetic reconnection scale up to reality?"

This session will focus on the question of whether the physics of magnetic reconnection observed in kinetic scale simulations is relevant on a larger scale (hundreds of ion inertial lengths). In particular, we would like to discuss the recent open boundary condition PIC simulation results, which seem to be at odds with the "standard model" of Hall-MHD reconnection.

We are going for an informal group discussion, but short presentations on the topics listed above are welcome. Please email John Dorelli (john.dorelli [at] unh.edu) or Mike Shay (shay [at] udel.edu) if you would like to participate.


Bow Shock Phenomena and their Magnetospheric Impacts

Conveners: N. Omidi <omidi [at] solanasci.com>, H. Kucharek <harald.kucharek [at] unh.edu>, and J. Eastwood <eastwood [at] ssl.berkeley.edu>

During the 2008 Summer GEM workshop in Zermatt Utah, one or more sessions on the bow shock and its magnetospheric impacts will be held. The main objective of the session is to utilize observations, modeling, and theory of the bow shock and related processes in the foreshock and the magnetosheath to assess the current status of the field and forge collaborative efforts towards addressing outstanding issues in the future. Based on the discussions during the mini-workshop held before the 2007 Fall AGU, we plan to focus on the following topics:

  1. Morphology of the ion foreshock as a function of IMF orientation
  2. Upstream waves and their role in preconditioning of the solar wind
  3. Upstream structures such a foreshock cavities and density holes
  4. Interaction of solar wind discontinuities (and CME/CIR) with the bow shock and the resulting phenomena such as hot flow anomalies (HFAs) or magnetic reconnection in the sheath
  5. Shock structure, dissipation processes and implications for waves in the magnetosheath
  6. Magnetosheath turbulence and impacts on the magnetopause

Those interested in these topics are invited to attend and contribute through showing a few slides and/or participation in the discussions. Information regarding hotel reservations and travel arrangements are posted on the GEM website (http://www.cpe.vt.edu/gem/). Those wishing to give a presentation or with questions regarding the workshop should contact the conveners omidi [at] solanasci.com, harald.kucharek [at] unh.edu, eastwood [at] ssl.berkeley.edu .


Plasma Entry and Tranport into and within the Magnetotail (PET)

Conveners: Antonius Otto <ao [at] how.gi.alaska.edu>, Jay R. Johnson <jrj [at] pppl.gov>, and Simon Wing <Simon.Wing [at] jhuapl.edu>

We would like to invite contributions to the PET focus group at the upcoming GEM workshop in Zermatt Resort, UT on June 22-27, 2008. The sessions will be held in a workshop-style in which each speaker will be allotted time for a 2-3 slides, in order to ensure enough time for discussion. Speakers are encouraged to focus their comments on unresolved issues related to a specific scientific question listed below. It is expected that there will be two sessions, both on Thursday June 26: (1) southward IMF 10:30-12:15 and (2) northward IMF 01:30 – 03:00. In addition, there will be a joint session with the M-I coupling FG on June 23 Monday 10:30-12:15. (See http://www.cpe.vt.edu/gem/index.html for the definitive schedule). Please send the title(s) and session(s) of your contribution(s) to us at your earliest convenience at the email addresses listed above.

The following lists the science questions of interest in these three sessions.

Session 1: Northward IMF conditions

a) Plasma entry: The session invites all contributions on models, theory, and observations relevant to the problem of plasma entry into the magnetosphere. Specific interest is given to criteria that quantify, are unique, or can be used to identify specific entry mechanisms.

b) Plasma transport and convection within the plasma sheet for northward IMF: The session addresses core questions concerning the spatial and temporal evolution of the cold dense plasma sheet material, turbulent processes, diffusion coefficient, convection, electric field, etc.

Session 2: Southward IMF conditions

Plasma transport during southward IMF conditions is presumably much more dominated by intermittent periods of fast plasma convection as during the expansion phases of substorms, or bursty bulk flows. However, it is not well understood how the plasma sheet is populated and reformed after periods of magnetic activity. Core topics include plasma transport into the inner magnetosphere, plasma sheet properties for steady southward vs. non-steady southward IMF, substorm recovery vs. steady magnetic convection, etc.

Session 3: together with MI Coupling

Heavy ions of ionospheric origin can at times be the dominant contributor to the mass density in the plasma sheet. Plasma sheet transport processes also exhibit signatures in the ionosphere that can be used to constrain plasma sheet transport models. Core topics include: (a) the ionosphere as a source of plasma sheet populations and determining the heavy ion distribution in the plasma sheet for various IMF conditions, (b) signatures of plasma sheet transport processes in the ionosphere (e.g. are there signatures of plasma sheet turbulence in the ionosphere?), and (c) the effect of ionospheric/heavy ions on plasma sheet transport and solar wind entry.


Dayside Magnetopause Reconnection

Conveners: Jean Berchem <jberchem [at] igpp.ucla.edu> and Nick Omidi <omidi [at] adelphia.net>

The GEM focus group on "Dayside Magnetopause Reconnection" will meet on Monday, June 23 (1:30 PM to 3:00 PM - Interlaken) during the GEM annual summer workshop at the Zermatt Resort in Midway, Utah (http://www.cpe.vt.edu/gem/ )

The goal of the "Dayside Magnetopause Reconnection" working group is to enhance our understanding of the properties and consequences of magnetic reconnection at the dayside magnetopause. During our last meeting in San Francisco, we identified the following topics to be discussed:

  1. Large-scale properties of reconnection at the magnetopause (e.g., merging patterns)
  2. The physics of magnetic reconnection at the dayside magnetopause (e.g., effects of density asymmetries)
  3. Quasi-steady and time dependent reconnection (e.g., FTEs)
  4. Plasma transport (e.g., particle entry and energization at the dayside magnetospheric boundary)
  5. Impacts of transients on the dayside magnetopause (e.g., RD and TD interactions)

Observational and theoretical contributions to this session are hereby solicited.

Please e-mail a title of your contribution to Jean Berchem <jberchem [at] igpp.ucla.edu> or Nick Omidi <omidi [at] adelphia.net>.


Physical Processes in the Cusps: Plasma Transport and Energization

Conveners: K.J. Trattner <karlheinz.j.trattner.dr [at] lmco.com>, N. Omidi and D. Sibeck

During the 2008 Summer GEM workshop in Zermatt Utah, a number of sessions on the physical processes in the cusp will be held. The main objective of these sessions is to utilize observations, modeling, and theory of the cusp and its role in particle acceleration and plasma transport to assess the current status of the field and forge collaborative efforts towards addressing outstanding issues in the future. Based on the topics in earlier years and the discussions during the mini-workshop held during the 2007 Fall AGU, we plan to focus on the following topics:

  1. Plasma transport into the cusp.
  2. Energization of ions in diamagnetic cavities.
  3. Origin of waves observed in the cusp and their role in particle scattering and acceleration.
  4. Interaction of FTE's with the cusp.
  5. The source region of energetic ions and electrons observed in the cusp.
  6. Ionospheric signatures of such processes such as Poleward Moving Auroral Forms

It is the ultimate goal of the workshop to enhance our understanding of the cusp physics, its coupling to other parts of the system such as the bow shock, magnetopause and the ionosphere and the important role it plays in dayside transport and energization. Observational and theoretical contributions to this session are hereby solicited.

Those interested in these topics are invited to attend and contribute through showing a few slides and/or participation in the discussions. Information regarding hotel reservations and travel arrangements will be posted on the GEM website (http://www.cpe.vt.edu/gem) in the near future. Those wishing to give a presentation or with questions regarding the workshop should contact the conveners trattner [at] mail.spasci.com, omidi [at] solanasci.com or david.g.sibeck [at] nasa.gov.


Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling, Electrodynamics and Transport (MICET)

Conveners: Bill Lotko <wl [at] dartmouth.edu> and Josh Semeter <jls [at] bu.edu>

We invite contributions to the MICET focus group at the upcoming GEM workshop in Zermatt Resort, UT on June 22-27, 2008. See http://www.cpe.vt.edu/gem/index.html for workshop information and schedule. Please send the title(s) and session(s) of your contribution(s) to us at your earliest convenience at the email addresses listed above.

The MICET sessions will be conducted in workshop style to ensure ample time for discussion. Participants are asked to provoke discussion by presenting a (few) slides on one or more of the key issues relevant to the Focus Group.

Two breakout sessions will be held on Monday, one in conjunction with the "Plasma Entry and Transport into and within the Magnetotail (PET)" Focus Group, with the possibility of a third session on Tuesday afternoon if interest is sufficient and a breakout room is available.

Session 1 - "MI coupling and magnetotail transport" (joint with the PET), Time: Monday 10:30 am - 12:15 pm, Room: Grindelwald

Topics: Heavy ions of ionospheric origin can at times be the dominant contributor to the mass density in the plasma sheet. Plasma sheet transport processes also exhibit signatures in the ionosphere that can be used to constrain plasma sheet transport models. Core topics include: (a) the ionosphere as a source of plasma sheet populations and determining the heavy ion distribution in the plasma sheet for various IMF conditions; (b) signatures of plasma sheet transport processes in the ionosphere (e.g. are there signatures of plasma sheet turbulence in the ionosphere?); and (c) the effect of ionospheric/heavy ions on plasma sheet transport and solar wind entry.

Session 2 - "MI coupling: New measurements, new models, new methods", Time: Monday, 1:30 - 3:00 pm, Room: Grindelwald

Topics: The modeling and observational characterization of MI coupling is complicated by the fact that MI coupling processes are locally enabled while being globally regulated and impressed. Examples of this dichotomy in the physics include a) local auroral and cusp plasma energization regulated by solar wind-magnetosphere dynamo processes and ionospheric state; b) local values of ionospheric conductance and field-aligned currents globally influencing MI electrodynamics via the solution to the ionospheric Poisson equation; c) scale-interactive feedback dynamics that modify dissipation in the ionosphere and low-altitude magnetosphere; and d) influence of heavy ion outflows on reconnection rates and ring-current dynamics. We would like to hear from participants on innovative measurements, models and methods for characterizing these and other relevant processes in MI coupling.


Near Earth Magnetosphere: Plasma, Fields and Coupling

Focus Group co-chairs: Sorin Zaharia (szaharia [at] lanl.gov), Stan Sazykin (sazykin [at] rice.edu) and Benoit Lavraud (Benoit.Lavraud [at] cesr.fr)

We would like to invite potential contributors to the Near Earth Magnetosphere: Plasma, Fields and Coupling Focus Group to participate with modeling, theoretical and observational studies related to the topics below. It is the ultimate goal of the focus group to improve physical knowledge and modeling of the near-Earth (< 10 RE) magnetosphere and its coupling with the outer magnetosphere.

1) Data-based empirical models for near-Earth magnetosphere Challenges: Developing better plasma sheet models (including activity binning and ion composition); better empirical models for electric and magnetic fields; both statistical models and models that are successful at describing single events.

2) Coupling processes in physics-based models (plasma/fields, waves/plasma, inner magnetosphere/plasma sheet) Challenges: Understanding the effect of the coupling between the plasma, fields and waves on inner magnetosphere structure/dynamics; quantifying the relative importance of these interactions for the morphology and dynamics of the near-Earth magnetosphere; ascertaining how well the various new physics features recently added in models are verified by/improve consistency with observations.

Potential contributors are urged to contact the conveners indicating their interest in participating. Although the sessions will be held workshop-style, time for a few (not more than 5) slides will be allotted for each contributor. Please send the title of your contribution to us at the email addresses above.

Besides the 2 sessions dedicated to the topics above, a 3rd session will be devoted to refining the direction of the focus group in the future; community input is both welcome and appreciated.

Finally, there will be a combined session with the Diffuse Auroral Precipitation Focus Group, entitled "Plasma sheet ion scattering." It will focus on theory, modeling and observations of the plasma sheet, magnetotail structure and the diffuse ion aurora. Contributors who study plasma sheet aspects such as ion isotropization by field curvature should express their interest in presenting in that session.

Space Radiation Climatology

Conveners: Paul O'Brien <paul.obrien [at] aero.org>, Geoff Reeves <reeves [at] lanl.gov>

It's almost time for the GEM Summer Workshop, joint with SHINE. The Space Radiation Climatology Focus Group (FG9) will meet for two breakout sessions on Thursday: 10:30-12:15 and 3:30-5:15. We encourage interested parties to send talk ideas to Geoff Reeves or Paul O'Brien. If you are presenting an FG9-related poster, please sign up for the Thursday Poster Session and advertise on the Wiki.

For more information, see the FG9 Wiki: http://virbo.org/wiki/index.php/GEM2008

The SRC FG will produce data-assimilative models of the magnetically trapped plasmas and radiation belts. These models will be run over an 11-year period (reanalysis) to produce a baseline space radiation climatology model for subsequent studies of long-term and statistical properties of the inner magnetosphere (climate statistics, solar wind coupling, etc.).

We invite participation from the broad GEM community. While we intend to maintain a largely informal discussion format, each session will be built around a few oral presentations. If you have an oral presentation of a general nature for any of our sessions, please send us the title of your contribution at you earliest convenience. For more detailed technical presentations, a poster is likely your best option. Please submit to the Thursday poster session.

To view or subscribe to the FG9 email archive, go to http://groups.google.com/group/gem-2007-space-radiation-climatology-fg9


Diffuse Auroral Precipitation

From: Richard Thorne <rmt [at] atmos.ucla.edu>

There will be four separate breakout sessions devoted to the Diffuse Auroral Precipitation Focus Group at the 2008 GEM workshop.

Thu, 26 June, 10:30 a.m. - 12:15 p.m., DAP 1: "Electron Pitch-Angle Scattering: Wave Observations and Theory"

Co-chaired by Richard Thorne (rmt [at] atmos.ucla.edu) and Nigel Meredith (nmer [at] bas.ac.uk).

This session will examine the global morphology and variability of two classes of magnetospheric plasma waves, electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH) and electromagnetic whistler mode chorus plasma waves, which are capable of interacting with plasma sheet electrons, leading to precipitation into the atmosphere. Theoretical calculations of pitch-angle scattering rates from each class of wave, under different levels of geomagnetic activity, will also be presented to assess their potential contribution to the global pattern of diffuse auroral precipitation.

Presentations will me made by Nigel Meredith (CRRES wave distributions), Binbin Ni (Chorus scattering) and Richard Thorne (ECH scattering). Others are solicited.

Thu, 26 June, 1:30 - 3:00 p.m., DAP 2: "The Origin of Diffuse Auroral Structure"

Co-chaired by Eric Donovan (edonovan [at] ucalgary.ca) and Mike Henderson (mghenderson [at] lanl.gov).

In this session, we will explore the origin of structure in the diffuse aurora, with a particular focus on advancing our understanding of the following:

  1. The modulation of diffuse aurora by pressure pulses, ULF pulsations and transients, and rapid and slow variations in convection (e.g., pulsating aurora, streamers, optical Pi2s, etc).
  2. The variation in diffuse auroral boundaries due to changes in magnetospheric topology, convection, and large- and small-scale waves and instabilities (e.g., giant undulations, Omega bands, growth phase variation of the trapping boundaries, patchy aurora, etc.).
  3. The spatial distribution of regions of strong and weak pitch angle diffusion (e.g., what do diffuse auroral boundaries correspond to in the magnetosphere)

This session will contain presentations by Tom Sotirelis (Boundaries), Mike Henderson (Giant Undulations), Marc Lessard (patchy/pulsating aurora), Dave Knudsen (small scale structure), and Eric Donovan (ULF modulation of diffuse aurora). Others are solicited.

Thu, 26 June, 3:30 - 5:00 p.m., DAP 3 (Joint with FG on Near Earth Magnetosphere): "Plasma Sheet Ion Scattering"

Co-chaired by Shawn Young (Shawn.Young [at] kirtland.af.mil) and Mark Lessard (marc.lessard [at] unh.edu)

The Diffuse Auroral Precipitation and Near Earth Magnetosphere focus groups are holding a combined session on "Plasma sheet ion scattering." The plasma sheet and magnetic field structure are tightly coupled. The plasma pressure stretches the field lines, which leads to current sheet scattering of ions into the atmosphere where they excite the diffuse ion aurora. The equator-ward edge of the diffuse aurora can provide valuable information on the magnetic structure in the magneto-tail. Ion precipitation can also be associated with features of the ring current. The plasma sheet ion scattering session will focus on theory, modeling and observations of the plasma sheet, magneto-tail structure and the diffuse ion aurora.

Fri, 27 June, 10:30 - 12:15 p.m., DAP 4: "Planning session for 2008-2009 activities"

Co-chaired by Jacob Bortnik (jbortnik [at] gmail.com) and Tom Sotirelis (tom.sotirelis [at] jhuapl.edu).

In this session Jacob Bortnik and Tom Sotirelis will discuss available data sources on waves and precipitating particles. We will also outline plans and objectives for the next year of the campaign.

Anyone interested in contributing to any of these sessions is encouraged to contact the relevant session chairs.


Perpendicular Ion Heating: Observations on Earth and Theory at the Sun [Joint GEM/SHINE Session]

From: Bob Lysak <bob [at] fields.space.umn.edu>

Ion heating transverse to the magnetic field and the associated ion outflow are common processes in the polar and auroral regions of the Earth and the corona of the Sun. The intent of this joint session is to bring together researchers in these areas and explore the similarities and differences between the two regions. On Earth, these heating and outflow processes can be studied with in situ satellite and rocket data, as well as with energetic neutral atom imaging, while in the corona, remote observations from instruments such as the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer on SOHO can be used to diagnose the properties of these ions. Theory and modeling efforts have been carried out in both regions. Despite the official title of the session, we solicit short contributions on observations, theory and modeling from either of these regions. The session will be held on Friday, June 27, from 10:30 am-12:15 pm. Please contact Ben Chandran (benjamin.chandran [at] unh.edu) or Bob Lysak (bob [at] aurora.space.umn.edu) if you are interested in making a short, informal presentation.


Multiple-Dip Geomagnetic Storms: Solar-Wind Drivers or Internal Magnetospheric Processes [Joint GEM/SHINE Session]

Conveners: Vania K. Jordanova <vania [at] lanl.gov> and Ian Richardson <ian.g.richardson [at] nasa.gov>

We invite you to participate in the joint GEM-SHINE session on multiple-dip geomagnetic storms that will be held during the 2008 Summer Workshop in Zermatt, Utah, on Monday afternoon 1:30-5:00 pm. The main objective of this session is to use observations, theory, and modeling to assess the current status and establish collaborative efforts towards understanding the physical processes of geomagnetic storms. In particular, we will focus on the role of external drivers and internal mechanisms in particle transport, acceleration, and loss during multiple-dip storms. The primary topics for discussion are:

  1. Solar sources of multiple-dip storms
  2. Interplanetary drivers of multiple-dip storms
  3. Role of the ionospheric source populations
  4. Effects of preconditioning of the plasma sheet
  5. Particle injection into the ring current, dayside outflows
  6. Effects of ion composition in multiple-dip storms
  7. Radiation belt dynamics, contribution of electrons
  8. Plasmasphere response, role of drainage plumes
  9. Coupling between these regions and feedback to the global system
  10. Methods of forecasting multiple-dip storms

We invite those interested in giving a short presentation, or with suggestions for other discussion topics, to contact the conveners Vania Jordanova (vania [at] lanl.gov) or Ian Richardson (ian.g.richardson [at] nasa.gov).


List of Joint GEM-SHINE Sessions

Below is a list of the 8 joint-GEM-SHINE topics and the GEM and SHINE co-conveners for each topic.

Attend the sessions or contact the co-conveners to participate.

More details about the eight topics are available on the SHINE website at http://shinegroup.org/shine2008/GEMsessiondescription.html


1. "Multiple-Dip Geomagnetic Storms: Solar-Wind Drivers or Internal Magnetospheric Processes"

SHINE co-convener: Jie Zhang <jzhang7 [at] gmu.edu>

SHINE co-convener: Ian Richarson <ian.g.richardson [at] nasa.gov>

GEM co-convener: Vania Jordanova <vania [at] lanl.gov>

Monday Afternoon: 1:30-5:00


2. "Creation and Propagation of CMEs and Plasmoids: Loss of Equilibrium and Subsequent Evolution"

SHINE co-convener: Kathy Reeves <kreeves [at] cfa.harvard.edu>

GEM co-convener: Joachim Birn <jbirn [at] lanl.gov>

Tuesday Morning: 10:30-12:15


3. "Small-Scale Structure in the Solar Wind and Its Effect on Earth"

SHINE co-convener: Joe Borovsky <jborovsky [at] lanl.gov>

GEM co-convener: Beniot Lavraud <Benoit.Lavraud [at] cesr.fr>

Tuesday Afternoon: 1:30-3:00


4. "Is there a Need for More-Detailed Solar-Wind Models"

SHINE co-convener: Nick Arge <Nick.Arge [at] Kirtland.af.mil>

GEM co-convener: Bob McPherron <rmcpherr [at] igpp.ucla.edu>

Tuesday Afternoon: 3:30-5:00


5. "What Determines When Reconnection Turns On? Chromosphere,Corona, Solar Wind, Magnetopause, and Magnetotail"

SHINE co-convener: Spiro Antiochus <spiro.k.antiochos [at] nasa.gov>

GEM co-convener: Mike Shay <shay [at] UDel.Edu>

Wednesday Morning: 10:30-12:15


6. "SEPs from Heliosphere to Magnetosphere"

Candidate SHINE co-convener: Janet Luhmann <jgluhman [at] ssl.berkeley.edu>

Candidate GEM co-convener: Mary Hudson <mary.hudson [at] dartmouth.edu>

Thursday Morning: 10:30-12:15


7. "Comparing the Properties of Magnetic Reconnection in Various Environments"

SHINE co-convener: Jack Gosling <Jack.Gosling [at] lasp.colorado.edu>

GEM co-convener: Michael Hesse <Michael.Hesse [at] nasa.gov>

Thursday Afternoon: 1:30-5:00


8. "Perpendicular Ion Heating: Observations at Earth and theory at the Sun"

SHINE co-convener: Ben Chandran <benjamin.chandran [at] unh.edu>

GEM co-convener: Bob Lysak <bob [at] fields.space.umn.edu>

Friday Morning: 10:30-12:15

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